Sea Salt vs Table Salt

Picture of a salt evaporation bed...

 

The other day I was sitting down to eat with a friend and she questioned the amount of salt I was sprinkling on my food and wondered why I wasn’t concerned about the potential ill effects of including salt in my diet. She seemed surprised when I told her the reasons for my salty habit:

 

Sea salt (not modern day table salt) is actually good for you. While modern salt is highly processed with little to no nutritional value, sea salt in its original form is rich in minerals your body needs. On the other hand, regular table salt is highly refined.  This refining process removes trace minerals, magnesium and iodine. In addition, aluminum and dextrose (sugar) are often added back into table salt.

 

Because I do not eat many processed foods my body handles the sodium very well. I don’t have any skin problems such as acne (which can worsen with salt intake) and I
don’t have osteoporosis or high blood pressure.

 

Salt is beneficial for people who are under stress and suffering from adrenal fatigue (is this you?).  According to a May 2009 study in “Clinical Science,” Dr. Barry Hurwitz and University of Miami researchers determined that the magnesium in sea salt improved mineral balance and low blood pressure in chronic fatigue syndrome sufferers.

 

I eat a lot of protein and the more protein you eat the more salt your body needs. Salt is good for digestion as it helps to activate enzymes in your intestines. Sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium also form alkaline reactions once inside the body. An alkaline state is beneficial to bone health, muscle mass as well as other health benefits. However, don’t take this too far as too much sodium will increase the loss of calcium in the urine.

 

I work out quite a bit and lose a fair degree of salt through perspiration (the more you exercise the more sodium is lost through perspiration. Active individuals can lose 800 mg or more of sodium per litre of sweat, making replacement vital). When your sodium level drops too low (less than 200 mg/day) activation of the renin- angiotensin-aldosterone system kicks in and increases the retention of sodium and water. 1200 mg of sodium per day is needed in order to suppress this system. This is one of the reasons why I recommend drinking lemon water with a pinch of sea salt. Not any salt will do. All salts are not created equal. Stay away from regular table salts. Instead, look for sea salts that are pink, red, grey or beige in color. This colour indicates a high content of iodine and valuable trace minerals. Some good sea salts to try include Celtic Sea Salt and Red Sea Salt.

 

The average North American now consumes about 3,400 mg of sodium per day and this is too much. Most experts recommend that we consume less than 2,300 mg per day.

 

To be very clear — I am not advocating a “high sodium” diet and yes, people who frequently consume refined and packaged foods are well advised to avoid adding extra sodium into their diets. However, for those people who already avoid eating processed foods and do not have high blood pressure the use of sea salt in their diets instead of table salt is well advised.

 

This post was written by

Bruce – who has written posts on Cutting edge muscle building and fat loss secrets.
bruce krahn is a best-selling author, writer, researcher, personal trainer and professional speaker. he has coached people for two decades both in person and online. he created this site to be an honest source of useful, practical information you can use to improve your health, build muscle, lose fat and get the lean body look.

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About

bruce krahn is a best-selling author, writer, researcher, personal trainer and professional speaker. he has coached people for two decades both in person and online. he created this site to be an honest source of useful, practical information you can use to improve your health, build muscle, lose fat and get the lean body look.

One Response to “Sea Salt vs Table Salt”

  1. [...] Food is the fuel our bodies use for everything that they do. Food gives us the building blocks our bodies need to move, build new muscles, and keep our brain going. That’s why nutrition is the most important thing for keeping your body healthy. Read on for some tips on nutrition that will make you feel better including what the truth is regarding sea salt vs table salt. [...]

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