Can you really build MORE muscle?

How fast can you build more muscle

 

 

 

 

 

Building muscle is no simple task.

I have been lifting weights for more than 25 years and I have not seen any significant increases in my lean body mass in over a decade.

Sure I have gained a few pounds of muscle but nothing like the gains I made many years ago.

This is fine by me as I have zero interest in being a massive bodybuilder. These days I train to keep the muscle I have, prevent unwanted fat gain and because I simply love how good it makes me feel.

But what if I wanted to build more muscle- would it be possible?

The truth is I have likely hit my genetic maximum and while I could probably gain 2 or 3 pounds if I really tried the chance of me gaining 10 or 15 pounds of muscle (without the use of muscle building drugs) at this point is slim to none.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the picture above, the “before” reflects several years of  poor training and wrong diet.  The results you see in the “after” came relatively quickly once I figured out how to combine the two properly. 

 

However, this may not be true for you.  Ask yourself the following questions to find out how fast you could build some new muscle:

 

 

How long have you been training?

This is the single most important factor. A 30 year old who has been training consistently and intelligently for 10 years will have far less muscle building potential than a 30 year old who has never lifted before. I say “intelligently” because if your lifting program consists of nothing more than planks, pushups and Bosu Ball training then you are probably nowhere near you genetic limit. In the past two decades of training clients I have discovered that there is an inverse relationship between training age and the amount of muscle you can build:

Years of consistent, intelligent training      Potential amount of muscle

1                                                                    2 pounds per month

2                                                                     1 pound per month

3                                                                      6 pounds per year

4                                                                      2-3 pounds per year

5 +                                                                   Reached genetic limit

 

Note: These numbers represent the average male. Female potential for muscle gain will be approximately half.

 

What are your testosterone levels?

Testosterone is your body’s key muscle building hormone and levels fluctuate widely from person to person. According to research, men aren’t what they used to be as testosterone levels in males are dropping by an average of 1.2% per year. That is a staggering decrease and will have a profound effect on body composition. A hormone boosting training program and intelligent diet will help optimize your levels but in many cases further intervention is necessary. The only way to know where you stand is to have your hormone levels analyzed using a simple blood test.  Ask your doctor to do this for you- I have had clients who were in their twenties who tested very low for their age.

 

Who are your parents?

Genetics play a large role in your muscle building potential. Some men can build muscle by just looking at the weights while others struggle to have arms that resemble something other than toothpicks. Most of us are average and fall somewhere in between these two extremes. Nothing you can do here except blame your parents I guess…

 

What is your training history?

I have helped many people complete body transformations. The ones who have the “easiest” transformation are those people who were in great shape, let themselves go and then got back into great shape. I know from personal experience that I have little problem regaining any muscle I may lose due to illness or inactivity. This is due to the “muscle memory” effect. Breaking new ground is an entirely different story however.

 

I am sure that some people reading this are thinking- if I have reached my genetic limit then why should I continue to workout?

The answer is simple- there are many benefits to strength training that go far beyond muscle building!  Strength training helps to maintain the muscle mass you have and keeps fat gain to a minimum. Lifting also increases bone density, helps manage pain, improves posture, relieves depression and keeps you looking younger than your years.  I will continue it for the rest of my life- I hope you do the same.

CLICK HERE FOR ONE YEAR OF PERSONALIZED TRAINING PROGRAMS AND MEAL PLANS FOR JUST $47!

 

 

 

This post was written by

Bruce – who has written posts on Cutting edge muscle building and fat loss secrets.
bruce krahn is a best-selling author, writer, researcher, personal trainer and professional speaker. he has coached people for two decades both in person and online. he created this site to be an honest source of useful, practical information you can use to improve your health, build muscle, lose fat and get the lean body look.

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About

bruce krahn is a best-selling author, writer, researcher, personal trainer and professional speaker. he has coached people for two decades both in person and online. he created this site to be an honest source of useful, practical information you can use to improve your health, build muscle, lose fat and get the lean body look.

One Response to “Can you really build MORE muscle?”

  1. Eileen says:

    Interesting, as usual. Physical exercise benefits the mind as much as good nutrition benefits the body. They are interchangeable.

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