How to lift 10,000 pounds

how to lift

 

 

 

 

 

It is a shame that so many of today’s popular fitness programs pay little to no attention to building strength.

 

It seems that the only result that is of interest these days is improving aesthetics and most people could care less if they could squat, dead lift or bench press their own body weight for reps.

 

I can certainly understand why people feel this way – after all body composition change is what the vast majority of my clientele are prioritizing as well.

 

And I am also guilty of this- the majority of my training is usually centered on keeping my body fat under control or bringing up a lagging body part.

 

But neglecting strength is a big mistake as it is a “use it or lose it” kind of thing that quickly diminishes over time.

 

The other thing about strength is how “functional” it is. Being stronger carries over to many of the physical challenges you face on a daily basis such as moving furniture, shoveling snow or even picking up your child.

 

Strength is also one of the fastest adaptations to occur when a person first starts a resistance training program. And what surprises most people is how rewarding this is.

 

I recently witnessed this first hand with a woman I have been working with. She is in her late 40’s and in great shape having lost several pounds of fat in the past few weeks. However the accomplishment that has her bragging most is about how physically strong she has become along the way.   

 

The reality of her strength really hit home the other day when she lifted 10,000 pounds.

 

Yes, your read that correctly- a woman in her late 40’s lifted 10,00 pounds.

 

Ok- to be fair she didn’t lift 10,000 pounds over her head or anything like that but she did dead lift a total of 10,000 pounds over the course of one single exercise session. Here is how she did it;

 

First, she warmed up her glutes and lower back with a few sets of glute bridges and the quadruped. The glute bridge in particular is a great exercise to help “teach” your body how to recruit the muscles of your glutes- something that is missing with many people who sit all day.

glute bridge

 

 

 

 

Next, she performed 2 warm up sets of the barbell dead lift using a moderate weight with the emphasis on executing perfect form.

 

barbell dead lift

 

 

 

She then proceeded to her work sets. We loaded a barbell up with 135 pounds. This is the equivalent to having one 45 pound plate on each end of an Olympic bar. After this the dead lifting began!

 

She completed 10 sets of 8 reps per set. When you do the math this breaks down to;

 

8×135= 1,080 (pounds lifted per set) x 10 sets= 10,800 total pounds.

Nice!

 

This is a simple method you can use to motivate yourself and progress your own workouts. Simply multiply your sets and weight and calculate the aggregate total number of pounds you lift for a given exercise. Your goal is then to increase this total the next time you return to that exercise again. I guarantee you will be surprised by how much weight you can move in a given workout if you really try.

 

I like to use this simple progression method for exercises like squats, dead lifts and bench presses but it can certainly be applied to other exercises as well. It’s just more impressive using these “big” lifts because you are able to use heavier weights and hit some pretty big numbers.

 

Let me know some of your totals in the comments below!     

 

This post was written by

admin – who has written posts on Cutting edge muscle building and fat loss secrets.
bruce krahn is a best-selling author, writer, researcher, personal trainer and professional speaker. he has coached people for two decades both in person and online. he created this site to be an honest source of useful, practical information you can use to improve your health, build muscle, lose fat and get the lean body look.

Email  • Google + • Facebook  • Twitter

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.

About

bruce krahn is a best-selling author, writer, researcher, personal trainer and professional speaker. he has coached people for two decades both in person and online. he created this site to be an honest source of useful, practical information you can use to improve your health, build muscle, lose fat and get the lean body look.

Leave a Reply